Moonlighter – Do a Run for Treasure and Then Sell It

The game Moonlighter is a combination rogue-lite dungeon-crawler mixed with trade simulation and story-rich RPG elements. This timeless, beautifully rendered pixel top-down was released by Digital Sun in 2018, and is available on most platforms such as PC, Xbox, Playstation, Nintendo Switch and even mobile.

Moonlighter is a story about hopeful adventurer Will, a shopkeeper in the small commercial town of Rynoka. Although his family’s shop offers stability and prosperity, it is sustained by the materials found deep in dungeons accessed through gates outside the village. Every night after the shop closes, Will skulks into the darkness to descend into the dungeons before teleporting back with a satchel of goods and the magical necklace that allows him to do so. The more he adventures though, the more he wants to pursue the question of what the dungeons and gates are exactly. When he uncovers a map of the interconnecting nature of the five gates, an adventure begins.

Getting Started in Moonlighter

There are a few things surely endearing to Moonlighter. The top-down pixel graphics are highly detailed and stylized, leading to an atmospheric experience. The game is cozy and interactive. Aside from dungeons, and your shop, there is a whole town that can be explored, and characters with meaningful interaction scattered night and day through the streets. The characters are natural and expressive, although the main character does not speak much. And though the dungeons offer re-generating challenges, they are fluid and add choices that matter to the other elements in the game. Such your experience might be, say discovering a book about Golems hidden in a pit just happened to fall into.
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Traditionally, rogue-lites or re-generating RPGs have a hook of sorts. The hook in Moonlighter is the combination of a dungeon crawler with a shopkeeping sim. Yet, neither are depreciative of the other element, leading to some pretty fulfilling holistic in-game commerce motivation. The complexity of the game’s shopkeeping interface allows you to gather and merchandise according to information provided by experimentation and exploration. Customers are real customers, and they even offer expression-filled thought bubbles as they react to your pricing–either a smile or a frown, which lets you know to change the price accordingly or leave it how it is. Record-keeping allows automatic storage of past pricing from materials gathered while moonlighting in the dungeons.

Comparative Games

You may remember a Nintendo game from the 90’s called Earthbound, also known as Mother. Earthbound has similarities to Moonlighter, for one stylistically, though some have compared Moonlighter more to the game Stardew Valley, which I agree with–when not slaying golems that is. Moonlighter is neatly packaged and presented, but it is by no means simple. With the incentive to do so, time can be continuously deluged into shopkeeping, crafting, gaining companions, collecting epic loot, or even getting to know neighbors. It’s sort of like a single-player, indie, MMO in that way–also a great source of replayability and nuanced gameplay.

Features of Moonlighter

Here are some top features of the world of Moonlighter

  • Dungeon-crawling
  • Combat and Swordplay
  • Shopkeeping Trade-Sim
  • Character Interaction
  • Crafting Armor and Enchantments
  • Collecting Loot and Selling it
  • Gaining Companions
  • Achievements
  • Story-Progression

My Take

This game is from 2018. Quality doesn’t seem to have diminished in Moonlighter. The detailed pixel art graphics are phenomenal in Moonlighter. It’s always encouraging in games to have a way to either start over and or just go back somewhere safe. Some call it lazy, I call it cozy.

The trade simulation element sof this game are amazing. How do they make customers gauge the value of a random mob junk in my shop. How? Coding I guess, but it is super immersive. Trade-sims are the best way to experiment with an economy, without actually using money.

It’s sort of stunning to me that Digital Sun has not released or projected any new games since the release of Moonlighter. There is certainly no absence of talent or innovation. Hard to say though. Either way, I applaud them for creating this really neat game with the bold notion of seeing the connection between a cozy trade-sim idea and a fun pixel art dungeon-crawler. It has endless replay value, although a DLC whenever or new release could be alot of fun too. Great to see such a humble production leave a bright legacy amongst indie fans, and a great example for devs to come.

Hold Down A to Close the Review

That’s what I have for you on Moonlighter. Just kinda plucked this one out of a stack, knowing that it was well praised, but in need of some research. If you would like to purchase this game, I have provided a link below that will supports new content.

Thank you so much for reading Mr. Dave Pizza. We have lots to come, and lots to share already, so have a look around, and please come back!

Down In Bermuda – Get Lost In This Tropical Puzzle – Review

Yak & Co released Down In Bermuda catering to the growing indie cozy fanbase Q3 of 2019. Yes, this game is over two years old, but with the occasional mega discounts, from time to time and continuing interest it’s cognizant to explore. It’s still relevant, fun, and cozy–indeed. The level of a-ha moments in this puzzle platformer is suited to YouTube, Twitch, or wherever you want to turn a gathering into a chill hangout. And even as much on your own, whether it’s the hunt of unlocking a puzzle on intuition alone that interests you or the pastel color stylizing, it’s certified enjoyable. With cool color theory islands and cool low-poly characters, this game offers contemporary and relevant gameplay for the new wholesome/cozy gamer base, which fits in right at home here at MrDavePizza.com.

Platforms: Nintendo Switch, PC, Xbox, Apple Arcade

Whoopsy Daisy: The Story, Does it Matter?

Down In Bermuda starts with an adventurous aviator, named Milton, nosediving over the ocean in a tumultuous storm. Non-stressful, existing only for an exciting intro to what is mostly a completely patient contemplative rest of the game amongst fun island buddies.

In summary, you’ll be solving puzzles involving light orbs, hidden temple-esque ruins, and various logic puzzles involving shapes and experimentation. After you have acquired enough of the see mystical light orbs, portals will allow you to hop to a new island in what I suppose is an archipelago like common in the tropic seas.

Even in the first two levels, solving puzzles can take a little exploring to figure out the type of game this is. While, the orbs are clearly visible once you’ve located them, along with relics, there is virtually no guidance on what to do. At the same time, puzzles which you do unlock, will be rewarding and so logical when you’re done. Down in Bermuda feels personable and whimsical. Maybe the next orb will be right in the open, maybe it’s a clam, or maybe you’ll turn the first wheel to the right and push a lever to the left. You’ll figure it out.

A Few Suprises in Down in Bermuda

In puzzle games, often it is the case that actions that you take do not necessarily hold any sentimental value aside from unlocking a new area. Indifference here is fine, but the thing is, the puzzles are super fun. Plus, the occasional quirky character shows up regularly. So, no need to feel alone, but no need to learn any backstories and such either. Had I not been able to solve the hidden object aspects of the game on my own, maybe there’d be nothing to say. You’ll learn the pacing of the game soon though, which is complex but forgiving.

There is one story that takes place in the game. As you may judge from the photo of the pilots in the above gallery, Milton is some sort of military aviator, and for whatever reason, he goes from being a young man in the intro to a hunched over long white-bearded character in these islands. It’s safe to say that not only are the island in Down in Bermuda part of Bermuda, but particularly the “Bermuda Triangle,” that paranormal legend of a place where navigators seem to vanish from time to time, or so the lore is. So, that does account for the mystical, magic, or bizarre aspects of these locations–if need be. Try to think of it as more of a template for doing cool puzzle stuff though.

Thanks for Reading

Anyway, that’s about it. Really. Puzzle games are definitely worth investigating here and there, but as the main gameplay, usually, for the sake of this website, it’s are they fun? And how does it look? Both do well here on Down in Bermuda, it’s really pleasant, so I’m on board with what have been some pretty positive reviews out there, and am confirming it with this one. Head over to the MrDavePizza.com homepage to find other reviews and tons of content. Thanks for visiting, and please come back. No seriously, get back here.

Greak: Memories of Azur – Really Nice To Look at And Play

Amongst the trove of pale-skinned characters, glowing misty caverns, and punchy character abilities, this one might be new to you. Greak: Memories of Azur is similar to platformers like Hollow Knight and Undertale, perhaps even Ori or maybe Hoa, sure. Don’t worry if you haven’t heard of any of those! What Greak offers is a borderline cozy adventure with very unique, engaging gameplay that is an experience of its own.

Greak, Adara, and Raydel

Meet your identities (triple) as you take the role, in a rotate-at-will-shift, three siblings as they puzzle and spelunk through the beautiful world of Azur. A challenging foe, known as the Urlags, has populated every corner of this world to wreak havoc. This calamity is beyond your own will, however, and as you journey these three characters, it is your objective to rebuild an airship to escape, one piece at a time.

These characters share a formidable offense with abilities varying from melee to ranged. Adara touts a wonderful ability to hover and jump from place to place. You might be familiar with this type of ability from the classic Super Mario Bros. 2, and even New Super Mario Bros. on Switch, as an ability of Princess Peach. The correlation beyond that is a purely personal whim, but it’s a fun mechanic to wield in the many puzzles and obstacles of the game. Greak’s personal triple jump ability is practical and dynamic. Major obstacles in the game move quickly and far. Greak: Memories of Azur has fast-moving gameplay intentionally.

The Land of Azur in Greak: Memories of Azur

Aside from any similar design parallels, Greak: Memories of Azur has a very comfortable world to adventure in. Yes, the Urlags can be quite intolerable with their ghoulish presence. Once weaved through, however, it’s not such a bad place to experiment with the environment for puzzle solving to advance. It felt quite nice to experience this concept in a world that is not purely dominated by monochromatic caves. The color is slightly muted, but it is pleasant, and it is definitely still colorful without too many distractions.

Final Thoughts

This game is traditional but uses its strengths in fast-paced gameplay to create a new and engaging experience. It’s affordable and has plenty of replay value, plus it’s supported on several platforms digitally or in retail.

Thank you for reading a review here at Mr. Dave Pizza. I welcome any comments or questions and hope to inform you in my next article and those before it. Please come back and have a look around while you’re here!

Good Pizza, Great Pizza – Wholesome Pizzeria Simulator – Review

In the Fall of 2020 when I was just launching the Mr. Dave Pizza concept, I played Good Pizza, Great Pizza by Tapblaze on an Android tablet, one of the many formats this game is available on. Today I played the official version released for Nintendo Switch to go back and really see what amused me about this game. Pizza, the food, has always been pretty popular, but in the last five years, it’s developed a near cult status. It’s kind of weird honestly, but it’s spun some pretty creative and entertaining ideas. So, after so much traffic from google here by indie-game-playing pizza lovers and truffle fast food cravers, I am issuing an inaugural validation of Good Pizza, Great Pizza as one of my favorite pizza-themed indie games of all time. At least that I’ve played–I’ll get to you, Freddy.

Platforms: PC, Switch, Android, Apple, Amazon

Good Pizza, Great Pizza: Greetings Ovenist

The game is generally inexpensive for versions without ads, although there are free versions on mobile with ads. Moving past that, the game works fine with a controller on Switch and presumably PC, and depending on which platform you use, it is possible to use the touchscreen as well (including on Switch.)

Now, let’s talk about the gameplay. Good Pizza, Great Pizza is a pizzeria simulator that puts you in the role of “ovenist,” order-taker, pizza maker, and entrepreneur at a cozy pinkish restaurant in a busy neighborhood across the street from the comic-relief bad guy competition named “Alicante.” Each day you start off a new business cycle, and customers drop in from off the street to order whatever pizza you can make them.

It is always possible to make what they request, but whether you pull it off is a different story. Alicante will drop in at the beginning of every shift to challenge you and discourage you from continuing. He’s the type of bad guy who accidentally compliments you wholeheartedly when you succeed or simply makes you laugh either way, so he’s not all that bad really, but you better heed his warnings.

Customers tend to exude certain customer varieties from a real pizzeria, and almost always phrase things in a way you have to listen to–or read actually–in order to complete their order. They say things like truffle cut in quarters or one-half of four pepperonis. It doesn’t sound too complicated, but it is very challenging at times. And when you mess up once, it can turn the flow of the whole pizzeria into a complete catastrophe. It’s not the end and you will get better, but you might half to improve your focus. Getting your timing right is everything.

Other Things in Good Pizza, Great Pizza

This game does not mess around. Okay, it messes around all the time. But if playing a wholesome pleasant pizzeria is your thing, Good Pizza, Great Pizza goes to town. Some features include a narrative story arc of four chapters that take you from a small neighborhood pizzeria to a big-time pizzeria celebrity.

In addition to that, there are several characters with individual personalities and dialogue, including the previously mentioned Alicante–but also cute, funny, strange, and humbling. Most of the dialogue is downright hilarious or just so weird it is charming. Not every customer is totally polite, but if you make their order right be expectant of delight in their response.

There are tons of new ingredients to add to your inventory, customer area upgrades, plus equipment upgrades. And there is even an achievement system that you can use to earn coins and compete online. Wow, this is pretty much the best pizzeria game I’ve ever seen. Most games of any genre don’t even have half of this much content to unlock. And you’ll find no disappointment in the quality of these really, because not only will you have the upgrades, it will totally change how your customers interact.

A Recommended Game

And at the apex of that very thrilling description, that’s pretty much it. Talk to customers, make their orders, and buy things. I may return to this if I really get serious about playing all the way through the story. After playing and researching for a few hours mixed with my previous experience, that’s the gist of this.

So, I hope you’re out there, you pizza seekers and hobbyists, because I am, and this pizzeria is just getting started. I hope this satisfied your search for whatever you were looking for.

This game is pretty much for everybody. The content is quite wholesome and if you can keep up with the orders there are some huge rewards for enjoying Good Pizza, Great Pizza. This one has been in Mr. Dave Pizza’s own oven for some time, and we’re glad to finally bring it to your tablet.

If you enjoy this, please come back, have a look around, leave a comment, and check out our social media. Thank you so much for reading Mr. Dave Pizza. Take care.

πŸ”½ If you’d like to download this game, here are official links to where it can be downloaded on various platforms.

πŸ€–Android

🍎Apple App Store:

πŸ„Nintendo Switch

πŸ’½Steam (PC)

πŸ”₯Amazon

The Gunk – Not Really Sure What This Is But It’s Fun

Discovered through Game Pass, I’m rather fond of this new title, The Gunk, from Image and Form/Thunderful Development, which just launched a few days ago. It fits neatly into the category of games I usually enjoy which are casual character development, soft sci-fi, and familiar mechanics of resource-collecting games. And this version of those styles is well presented here. While the game is really very straightforward without much need for introduction, a quality I appreciate, I’ll share some highlights on my experience playing through the first few areas plus what you should know about this game.

The Gunk: The Funk

I might note some various games and movies because there are elements of my geek lexicon that are scattered throughout The Gunk. To begin with, the story is about a descent into an alien world from a hovering ship, with two friends that are looking for materials to haul for trade, or more accurately scrape by. After a little exploration, they discover the planet they are on is a feast of tradeable materials that, if they discover the mystery of, will most likely go further in making them rich. It’s got a Starlord feel for sure, or Rae–I don’t know it’s space harvesting, practically its own archetype now. After that, you craftily explore mines, caverns, and contained areas to collect materials that are energy sources for their operations.

This storyline is not a storyline as much as a guided tour through a planet. There is some casual character development of the two friends who work this operation along with their robot. There is, however, some background given in the levels I played as the characters communicate with each other over radio, a neat way to keep things relevant but also on track.

Visual Styles in The Gunk

I think it’s unlikely that The Gunk is to any extreme a borrower of style from games I can think of, but it does remind me quite pleasantly of an indie game I played called Twin Stones. The primary similarity though is design, not gameplay. The worlds combine scaling chasms and lush green platforms in a similar way, and it is very welcoming to casual play. It’s something new, but also a style I can pick up and play straight away. So, it’s familiar, basically.

Aside from the environment, the particle effects, whether it’s the rock scanner or heaps of pink gunk–in The Gunk–are very clean and cool in the usual sci-fi way. The harvesting vacuum reminds me Slime Rancher. We’re talking about a whole different experience here, but it’s nice to see fun mechanics getting revived whatever their origin might be. I compare in only an admirer’s way. I still think there is some other game I’m thinking of here but I really have no idea, so kudos to the devs.

Out Now

The Gunk is out now for free with a Game Pass subscription. It’s certainly worth your time and it is so in a way where even if you just play the first few areas, it’s a nice traditional romp in space game for all kinds of players. (There is a very slight presence of mature language, but it seems to be minimal.)

You might want to play more though, for which I give the green light all the way. I have taken a look at some areas further into the game and there is no shortage of adventure and creativity. If you’d like to play this you can find it on Microsoft at https://www.xbox.com/en-us/games/store/the-gunk/9P008L2LS87F

Thank you for reading Mr. Dave Pizza. I hope you enjoyed this article and my website. I welcome you to look around at whatever you like!

This is How I Get Screenshots From my Switch

The ability to transfer screenshots from the Nintendo Switch can be ironically confusing with all the support for social media the console has. There are a lot of content creators out there, and when it comes to finding media, which is one reason these Switch screenshots can be almost crucial. Most devices with USB capability have almost complicit plug-and-play, the Nintendo Switch mostly does too–almost. In this brief tutorial, I’ll tell you how to transfer switch screenshots via USB with no problems. This includes videos captured onto the Switch as well. Let’s get started.

To Transfer Switch Screenshots via USB, Do This

To begin with, here is an initial tip for new Switch owners here, there is a button on the joy-con as well as pro-controller to take screenshots. Press it quick and it captures it, saving it to the switch memory. Hold it for 3-5 seconds and it will record the last 30 seconds of gameplay. You must be in-game to use this.

With this knowledge, you should be aware that there is a menu option on the home screen in the circle buttons below to look at screenshots. This shows everything you have saved.

To aid you in this process, here is a step-by-step list of how Transfer Switch Screenshots via USB with these steps.

  1. To transfer them, go to the gear for settings
  2. Scroll down to “Data Management”
  3. Next, head to “Manage Screenshots and Videos”
  4. Select Connect to PC Via USB
  5. Next, plug in your USB-C cable’s small end first to the bottom of the switch display (you’ll need to remove it from the dock.)
  6. Plug the regular USB end into your computer or laptop
  7. Open File Explorer (I guess this would be in Finder for Mac OSX)
  8. Next, go to PC then “Nintendo Switch”
  9. You’ll see a list of folders with game names.
  10. Open the game screens you want to transfer.
  11. Copy and paste to your computer
  12. That’s it, you’re done.
  13. Push the disconnect button on the Switch.

Screenshots From Instructions

If you make YouTube videos or share gameplay and screenshots for blogging or other reasons, this really does make things go a lot faster. You can upload directly to Facebook and Twitter on the Switch, but I prefer this method.

Thanks so much for reading Mr. Dave Pizza. I hope this helped. Have a look around my site if you like, as you’ll notice I have created many content videos and used screenshots to review articles. I have written some other tutorials regarding gaming and game development as well, under the How-To section.