How to Get Xbox Game Pass on PC

In this article, I’ll show you how to get Xbox Game Pass on PC. If you thought that Xbox Game Pass was a console-only service, it’s actually available on Windows PCs too! I’ve been using Xbox Game Pass on PC for about a year now. Although I’ve paused my account a few times, it has been one of my top resources. Xbox Game Pass is a service from Microsoft’s Xbox that makes available 100+ video games for digital download on a subscription basis.

I’m not attempting to upsell you the service, but it’s truly one of the best gaming services out there. You can play day-one releases as well as past releases from Bethesda, EA, as well as tons of mid-tier indies like Hades and Stardew Valley. The setup is easy so I’ll get started.

What You Need to Get Started – How to Get Xbox Game Pass on PC

How to get Xbox Game Pass on PC
Some of the Games Currently on Xbox Game Pass (Check for Current Selection)

The Game Pass service is originally something available on Xbox consoles. Within the past few years, it has been ported over to Windows PCs that have gaming capability. It is not a streaming service like GeForce Now. You can download the games and play them locally. When your subscription runs out your game data is backed up to the cloud until you want to renew your subscription.

You’ll need at least Windows 10 installed on a PC, with moderate system specifications for many of the games but not all of them. Xbox allows you to browse the current games on its service before you even sign up, so you can see what the requirements are if you have your eyes on a particular game or two.

You’ll also need an internet connection, which seems like it might be obvious but maybe not. In all honesty, though, you’ll only need it to sign up and download the games. Your computer can be offline for up to 30 days before it will need to be re-authorized. For the best experience though I recommend a stable internet connection. Most likely you’ll want to check the app regularly though to see what games are new too. They are updated frequently and often highly anticipated games get released under the cover of night as a big surprise. You can also see some of the games which are coming soon, but some just show up.

Next, Download the App on Windows – How to Get Xbox Game Pass on PC

This part is pretty simple. Just for the record, you can set up your account in either the Game Pass app or the Xbox website. Your first month is only $1, so you’d be crazy not to go for that deal honestly, and after you do signup you can cancel at any time immediately, pro-rated. Xbox is literally raining money.

The Xbox PC Game Pass website is here: https://www.xbox.com/en-US/xbox-game-pass/pc-game-pass

Either join on the website with whatever account information you need to add (Note: you may need to set up a Microsoft account if you don’t already have one, but you can use the same one as your Windows login or a new one quick and free.) Afterward, click the download button in the upper right that says “Download the App.”

How to get Xbox Game Pass on PC
Screenshot of Xbox GamePass Website

Run the Install, and You’re All Set

And that’s it. Prepare to play tons of awesome games that you can download at any time. Even if you do find yourself unable to afford it for a period of time, you can always see what games are new in the app. If you are a gamer though, you’ll most likely always want to have it, because you will save tons of money on games with it. Heck, even as I just was writing this, a popular new game just dropped in the new games.

Oh, and just one other thing to mention, I have found a very helpful resource for ranking games on Game Pass and getting a comprehensive view of what’s available through a third-party website called Gamepassta. You can check that out at https://www.gamepassta.com/

Anyway, I hope this article helped you figure out what to do. Thank you for reading this article, I’m Mr. Dave Pizza, enjoy your games!

Why Are Indie Games Popular? – The Truth

First of all, indie games are my favorite “genre.” I think this is an important cultural phenomenon–and also a fun one–but for argument, let’s scrutinize it. So, Indie games usually have fewer details, less polished graphics, and are often focused on the simpler things, so why are indie games popular? And additionally, I might even ask, are they? I’ve been playing and writing about indie games for a couple of years now and I have seen so many genres and concepts that make the games I used to play seem unnecessarily photorealistic and expensive. Knowing what goes into game development actually helped me realize the simple joys of low-scale projects scattered across Steam and the bizarrely creative ItchIO platforms. I’m going to answer this question, because well, I need to, and it’s an important question.

Reason #1 of Why are Indie Games Popular: They’re Cheaper (Well, they are)

Why Are Indie Games Popular?
Celeste

When I was younger, before Steam and all of that kind of thing, there weren’t even really such things as indie games. You either bought the available Nintendo or Sega games at the store, rented it from Blockbuster or Family Video, or got lucky with a hand-me-down or sometimes demos. These days, you can get 1,000s of games not only cheap but totally free–on every platform! That certainly fuels the desire of many gamers. Because if you are like me, those old days of playing one or two games on repeat, while blissful back then, seem totally dreadful to me now.

The cheapness of indie games does give credit to small developers, but it also gives communities a voice that is getting louder. Trends and fashions come and go, but subcultures and artistic aesthetics take grip in a fiercely creative new generation. These days, owning an indie game, even one that you downloaded, can almost seem symbolic with all kinds of social media outlets to share it–or dare I even say, cool! (That’s right, cool AND affordable.)

But this is all kind of abstract.

Reason #2 of Why Indie Games Are Popular: They’re New

Why Are Indie Games Popular?
Viruaverse

The pandemic took a lot of people into new hobbies and even careers involving new things to spend time at home with. This culturally generated shift has prompted what some content creation historians might consider the last great shift in digital individualism.

You can start a podcast, a blog like this, make a movie, music (without any instruments), or more relevantly, video games. When you play an indie game you’re playing something from a real person or small group of people that you can hop on Twitter with and literally talk to like a next-door neighbor in your DMs. I marvel at such transparency, personally.

Indie games also are prolific in saturating the game market. There are so many new games on a regular basis now that you can be a pixel art warrior in the morning and a digital ski-baller at night, both with a spin on current events and not breaking the bank once again.

Reason #3 of Why Indie Games Are Popular: They’re Unique! Perhaps Even Quirky

Why Are Indie Games Popular?
Donut County

So, yeah, obviously this is the #3 on the list, but number one on the books. Indie games can be totally super-duper weird, and get away with it because there are no board meetings or stocks to trade, it’s all in the mind of the dev. Those of us who are fluent in Reddit speak and general geek-speak know there are some pretty wild subcultures out there, and we’re all for it.

Indie games allow for the type of free speech that free speech is intended for. Not the weird abusive anger you see in the headlines, but the kind where somebody who could never produce a TV show suddenly makes a game about that crazy idea they’ve had for years but couldn’t quite share within the limits of their social network.

Reason #4: They’re just cool, and some additional thoughts

Monster Pub Cheers
Monster Pub

Basically, indie games are just cool. Good art is like that. Michelangelo painted the Sistine Chapel ceiling by himself and it’s regarded as perhaps one of the most beautiful masterpieces in history. As such, I really like playing funny games with weird graphics. Not the same at all, but good things can come from the rogue midnight-oil coders of the ambitions of a day-time waitress or a stay-at-home-dad. I have played many great indie games out there, and here are a few:

  1. Celeste
  2. Cryptid Crush
  3. Stardew Valley
  4. Cosmo’s Quickstop
  5. Hades
  6. Hoa

Thanks for reading

These are just some general thoughts I had after spending many days playing indie games and wondering what they had in store for me. It really is a great way to play games and it helped me escape from the lofty polish of more popular games. Games are fun but try something different when you choose your next game, you might like it. If you’re already doing so, keep on playing those indies!

This article was written for MrDavePizza.com by Dave Pizza. Thanks for reading!

How To Find Free Games On Steam

This is a tutorial on how to find and download free games on Steam. If you’re familiar with the Steam client store or website, you might know the layout can be incredibly open-ended. I use it every day, and it is one of my most useful resources. This allows for some exploration of methods to filter new games posted. Steam is considered one of the most essential clients for finding new game releases for digital download on PC. It is home to tens of thousands of retail, but also free, games.

This isn’t a terribly complicated process, however, for the Steam client, or website, the interface can be a little layered. Not bad, just slightly hidden! To find free games on Steam, there are a few shortcuts to know. You can use it not only to find free games but also to sort them. This can be based on release date or even genre (also known as tags on Steam.)

Get Free Games on Steam Through the Steam Client

If you do not already have Steam, start by going over to store.steampowered.com and setting up an account. If you already have Steam, skip to the next part. There is a green button in the upper right of the main store page labeled “Install Steam.” Download and install the client. Set up an account, or use an existing one, then follow the steps to verify your account.

Download the Steam Client
Download and Install the Steam Client

Steam has been around since digital game delivery first existed and is considered a pioneer in this type of service. As such, you may already have a Steam account that you’ve forgotten about! You can either set up a new account or go through the recovery process for your old account. Usually, this involves a process of verifying Captcha, or you might just need to verify an email.

At any rate, you should now be logged into your account with the client before moving on to the next step.

Finding Free Games From the Front Page

Next, if you are not already there by default, go to the Steam store page. This is the first section on the client menu and will be denoted by the main page of the client. Steam has many promotional events occurring throughout the year, so if you’re unfamiliar with Steam content, this is a good place to see what it’s all about.

The Steam Store Page
The Steam Store Page

Once, you are in the Steam Store, look for the search box in the upper right of the page. Click the magnifying glass in the corner. I’m not sure why this is how this page is accessed, but it is the quickest way.

Click the Magnifying Glass (It’s tiny!)

Sorting Free Games on Steam

On the right side of the all products page, you are now at, there is a section called “Narrow by Price.” Drag the price slider in the upper right all the way to the left, so that the price range says Free.

Narrow Price to Find Free Games on Steam
Narrow by Price (Slide Left for Free)

It should look something like this:

Free Games on Steam
Free Games!

Okay, you’re almost there. Actually, you pretty much are, but there are a few more tips I have to offer that will make this task a little more rewarding in finding exactly the type of free games you want.

Initially, you’ll only see the most popular free releases in the list of games available. If this is what you wanted, you are done, but I’ll show you how to take it a step further.

Next to the price slide in the upper right, there is a dropdown menu that’s labeled “Sort by.” Click it and change the selection to “Release Date.”

Sort Free Games on Steam by Release Date
Sort By Release Date for Newest Free Games

You should now see a list of all the most recent free games on Steam.

There are a variety of types of free games in this list, classified as either free, free-to-play, or demo. While demos are a type of free game and plenty of fun, they are not typically the whole game and just a preview copy. If you want to try demos, you can find them with this method, but you can also filter out demos as well.

Select Game Type and Narrow By Tag

Below the price slider, look at the sidebar menu that says “Select Game Type.” Click “Games.”

Select Games Only
Select Games to Filter Out Demos

Now, all of the games on the list will be labeled as “Free” or “Free to Play.” Choose something that looks interesting, download it if you wish, and play–or browse through and look at the other games.

You can even sort the genre of games by selecting from the “Narrow by tag” list. This is a fun system in the Steam store interface that allows you to narrow down exactly what type of game you want within hundreds of unique descriptors that games are listed in.

You Can Even Sort By Genre

A small note: some games are listed as either free or free to play, but there is no overall difference between each type of game. The only difference I have found is sometimes free-to-play is a temporary tag, but not necessarily. Free games are invariably just simply free.

A Note About Links That Lead to Games that Aren’t Available

What the Add To Wishlist Button Looks Like in Steam

If you go to a page that says free but it’s actually a closed Early Access or there’s no game at all, this is just a consequence of the game being listed incorrectly. It can be a little annoying if it happens with a game that looks interesting. If you’d like, you can resolve this by adding the game to your wishlist so that you’ll be notified when it’s released.

Have Fun!

That’s all for this tutorial. Potentially, you’ve found this page by watching one of my YouTube videos. If you found this tutorial useful, please see some of my other articles! If you are actually looking for free games that I’ve reviewed, be my guest and go here for my reviewed free games! Thanks for reading MrDavePizza! Enjoy your games.

JoyToKey and How to Keybind Your Controller

This article is about how to keybind your game controller with JoytoKey to play games that require various keyboard keys to play. I use this with browser games on Itch.IO, if there is no native controller support. A lot of platformers and games on Itch.IO and Steam use a keyboard and mouse, but generally, I prefer controller support. Keybinding is a useful ability that can allow you to play more responsively, or even play an indie with your controller–even wireless controllers!

On YouTube

Getting Started with JoyToKey

There are many programs available on the web for binding keys to a controller, but I’ve found JoyToKey to be the easiest, and it is also free. You can purchase a registration key if you wish, but it is not required. The program is classified as shareware, so you are within your right to either use it for free or support the developers with a purchase.

I visited the JoyToKey website today, and my only suggestion about that is to click the right area. This program is safe and free. If you so desire, you can download the game from sites like Softpedia, but I’ll link directly to the JoyToKey download page here to support the developers.

Setup Steps for JoyToKey

JoyToKey download
Download JoyToKey from one of the first three links
  1. First, download JoyToKey from the JoyToKey website.
  2. Click one of the download links in the area below where it says “Download the Latest Version”
  3. Follow the Setup instructions and then open the program.
JoytoKey Install
Follow the on-screen instructions to install

Tip: Make sure that your controller is connected before setting up a new JoyToKey profile. If you are using a Bluetooth controller like the Xbox One controller, make sure it is connected wirelessly. This will help you let JoytoKey highlight which button you want to bind in yellow and make it A TON easier to know which button you’re binding.

What to Configure

Most keyboard-controlled games will use some variation of the directional keys, left down up, and right, or WASD. This can vary, but not much. Aside from a few variations for action or jumping keys, that usually sums it up. Note, that I do not cover integrating mouse support in this tutorial, but it is also possible using JoyToKey by pressing to highlight and then, configuring the analog stick directions on your controller.

Make sure your controller is connected

As an example, I configured the keys for a game called Ducksoup Dungeon by developer Richard Lems on ItchIO. I’m using this game because I am familiar with the controls from my review of it. Many browser games on Itch.IO say what keys to use right on the front page. Here the controls are directional, plus the keys D, and F for jumping and combat.

To configure a button, find it on the button list and double-click. A window will come up that says “Assignment for:” etc. This is where you choose your key. So for example, I want the up button on my Xbox One controller to trigger the up arrow key on my keyboard. I enter it into the yellow area.

Almost There

It might help to play the game with the keyboard first to decide how you want to lay out the keys on your controller.

Ducksoup Dungeon
Ducksoup Dungeon on Itch.IO

For me, I’m binding the directional keys for the keyboard to the directional keys on my controller. Then the D to my X-button, and F to my A button. This is a natural type of layout for games that already support controllers.

Now Play Your Game With JoyToKey Configured

Playing Ducksoup Dungeon
Playing Ducksoup Dungeon

And look, I’m playing this browser game with my Xbox controller!

If you liked this tutorial please have a look at some of my other gaming tips and tutorials. Thank you for reading MrDavePizza.

Enjoy your games.

Starbound – Completing the First Planet (Quick Guide)

In Starbound, you use Terraria-style mining mechanics to collect materials and progress through the galaxy. This game was released in 2016. It has had some resurgence thanks to a re-release of the game on the invaluable Xbox PC Game Pass platform. I figured since I didn’t find immediate coverage of my own questions, new players may be wondering how to progress in this game. The game takes place in outer space. It has a plotline involving being stranded in space after a cataclysmic invasion destroys the planet. With some basic tools, you’re left to fend for your own. With a damaged spaceship, you escape to the orbit of a wild alien planet. Now that everyone knows the background, let’s get into how to make it past the first planet!

Some Initial Tips on Starbound For Beginners

Your Trusty New–Broken–Ship

You could also compare Starbound to Minecraft, but the storyline is more similar to a combination of Terraria and an RPG. I’ve been wanting to try Starbound from Chucklefish ever since I first learned that it was similar to Stardew Valley.

The initial planet represents the core repeating questline of the game’s open world. Completing it is a good way to set the course for the rest of the game. Thanks to the brief intro of the game at the Protectorate base, you’ll have a useful tool called a Manipulator. It’s kind of like a mix between a mining pick and a phaser. It allows you to mine materials from the inside and collects dirt, ore, objects, and more. This, and your broadsword, will provide what you need to complete the first quest. Collecting core fragments for a special arc temple that will allow you to reconnect with an alien space station.

Currently Orbited World

If you’re already at this stage, you have more or less figured out how to get through the intro. You may want to experiment a bit to figure out the controls before moving on. For starters, the action bar at the top of the page allows you to place items into it. You can then access them quickly with your mouse. By default, your manipulator, magnifying glass, and broadsword will already appear on the bar from the start.

Starbound Action Bar
Action Bar

I recommend grabbing the flashlight out of your ship’s locker as well because it can get quite dark when traversing through the caverns of the planet! Torches also help and are easy to craft using lumber harvested from trees and bits of coal mined from the dirt. Dangling plant matter from the ceiling of caves can also be used to craft ropes, which are helpful when exploring.

Being Careful in Starbound

When you create your character in Starbound, I highly advise you to choose the casual mode for your character. The more difficult settings can be totally brutal. When getting started, survival mode is really not necessary to be challenged by the game.

Additionally, you should act quickly to cook food from ingredients you find along the surface. This will be vital after getting damaged by creatures or accidental falls when exploring. You can also find or craft bandages and health kits, but this might be difficult on the first planet. They are however dropped by several of the creatures around, and inside, the planet.

There are so many strategies and techniques when getting started. It’s kind of excessive to go over all of them, which is why I’m focusing on the basics. The best thing to do when you get started is just explore. See how things work, hoping to find out where the quest is. Do try a few things like harvesting, mining, cooking, and crafting though. This will help you with the overall strategies of the game. It’s also fun.

Finding the First Temple and Mine

The temple is an ancient-looking structure that is easy to find. It’s also where you get your first quest and the first step in teleporting to the next area. Just walk along the surface of the planet until you find it. It might seem like a long distance, but after you pass over the three major hills on the first planet, you should arrive there fairly soon. It’s a big gray stone structure with an open platform. You won’t miss it.

Stabound Arc
The Temple

You will get a quest to obtain 20 core fragments. There are a couple of ways to get them, although overall there is probably only one superior way. Some people suggest mining for core fragments deep below the surface where the rocks are filled with red lava. While this is possible, it can be really frustrating if you spend 20 minutes digging and fall into a pool of lava! Try this method instead. First, ransack the crates through the mining outpost. Next, defeat the big monster in the basement of the mine. I’ll tell you how.

Once again, this is a location you’ll find by walking along the surface. One notable aspect that will help you find the mine quicker is that the entrance is manned by a human. He tells you to check the mine for fragments–well, that was simple, right?

Collecting the Core Fragments

Using your flashlight, torches, manipulator, and sword, make your way through the platforms of the mine. You can move through surfaces underground, by pressing down (S-key) and space bar–a traditional platformer mechanic. Open up the crates with your manipulator and collect as many fragments as you can. Then go after this guy in the lower right corridor. You will have to use the E-key to open the doors.

Starbound Mine Monster
All the boxes behind him are filled with core fragments.

He is a bit tough to destroy in one go. If you are in casual mode, good news: your hit points will still apply even if he forces you to regenerate on your ship. You most likely won’t have enough armor to get away with it in one strike. After you defeat him, collect the fragments and head back up to the surface then to the temple.

Turn in the Core Fragments and Teleport to The Ark

Turn in the Fragments
Turn in the fragments.
Save the teleporter
Teleport to the Ark, and save the teleport location.

And, that’s pretty much it. After being teleported to The Ark, a survival ship with refugees, you have completed the quest. From here, you can save teleporter locations to access your ship and talk to the grand protectorate about the following storyline.

This guide is also summarized on YouTube

Thanks for Reading This Guide, Please Look Around!

This is actually the first guide, or game guide at least, that I’ve written to be totally honest. The pressure to make some has been quite strong for a while, so I decided to make Starbound the game to start with, since it happens to be my current obsession. Check back again for more tutorials, or explore the vast amount of indie game coverage here at MrDavePizza. Thanks!

This is How I Get Screenshots From my Switch

The ability to transfer screenshots from the Nintendo Switch can be ironically confusing with all the support for social media the console has. There are a lot of content creators out there, and when it comes to finding media, which is one reason these Switch screenshots can be almost crucial. Most devices with USB capability have almost complicit plug-and-play, the Nintendo Switch mostly does too–almost. In this brief tutorial, I’ll tell you how to transfer switch screenshots via USB with no problems. This includes videos captured onto the Switch as well. Let’s get started.

To Transfer Switch Screenshots via USB, Do This

To begin with, here is an initial tip for new Switch owners here, there is a button on the joy-con as well as pro-controller to take screenshots. Press it quick and it captures it, saving it to the switch memory. Hold it for 3-5 seconds and it will record the last 30 seconds of gameplay. You must be in-game to use this.

With this knowledge, you should be aware that there is a menu option on the home screen in the circle buttons below to look at screenshots. This shows everything you have saved.

To aid you in this process, here is a step-by-step list of how Transfer Switch Screenshots via USB with these steps.

  1. To transfer them, go to the gear for settings
  2. Scroll down to “Data Management”
  3. Next, head to “Manage Screenshots and Videos”
  4. Select Connect to PC Via USB
  5. Next, plug in your USB-C cable’s small end first to the bottom of the switch display (you’ll need to remove it from the dock.)
  6. Plug the regular USB end into your computer or laptop
  7. Open File Explorer (I guess this would be in Finder for Mac OSX)
  8. Next, go to PC then “Nintendo Switch”
  9. You’ll see a list of folders with game names.
  10. Open the game screens you want to transfer.
  11. Copy and paste to your computer
  12. That’s it, you’re done.
  13. Push the disconnect button on the Switch.

Screenshots From Instructions

If you make YouTube videos or share gameplay and screenshots for blogging or other reasons, this really does make things go a lot faster. You can upload directly to Facebook and Twitter on the Switch, but I prefer this method.

Thanks so much for reading Mr. Dave Pizza. I hope this helped. Have a look around my site if you like, as you’ll notice I have created many content videos and used screenshots to review articles. I have written some other tutorials regarding gaming and game development as well, under the How-To section.

Write Nice Reviews About Games

So you want to write a nice review? As I glide through a tremendous Steam list full of unique reviews, it’s actually pretty awesome that gamers are getting involved and writing thoughtful reviews even though some are, not inaccurately, blunt. Praising reviews and critical reviews both serve a purpose. Even a 5-word sentence that reads something like “Just spins me around infinitely” is actually helpful, because if the game costs $20, you might have a point. But let me tell you how, for me, nice reviews are still the best review.

I don’t want to teach a gaming audience how to leave nasty reviews for a bunch of games on Steam though! HECK NO. I won’t have you playing any of that foosball.

Here at Dave Pizza, we’re all about positivity, kindness, and optimism, because you know what? No matter what level of toxic PVP aggression you’re knee-deep in on your own times, indie developers are regular people with bold ideas and a lot of ambition. Yeah, I know, some of them are still learning, but that is not an invitation to tear anybody down.

So, let’s do this. How do you say something helpful and nice, in the most paradigm-shifting way?

Write a Nice Review: The Count Your Blessings Section

Playing indie games literally changed my life this past year. I made friends, learned how to hone my craft, and learned from my fellow peers. Incidentally, I also witnessed the abhorrent decimation of one of my most anticipated games ever: Cyberpunk 2077.

Write a Nice Review

As that game fell through for so many people in a way that quite frankly bewildered me, I was playing indie games and seeing people trying new things, sometimes failing, but also being supported. Now, I realize that the game I just mentioned had quite a pricey pre-order, but it made me want to consider what was happening in the public opinion ecology of the gaming community.

So, say you want to review a game like Cyberpunk 2077 that doesn’t have the kinks worked out. Only it’s a low-budget indie and someone is working on it with their brother in their basement or themselves. Did you pay money? Or did you get it for free? Was it early access, a beta, or hey what about a free Steam key for your blog? Honestly, I don’t even care, did you make the same game? Be a nice person and start off with a hefty bun of the love sandwich.

Write a Nice Review: The Short Review

This is what I’m going to call “The Short Review.” I am specifically thinking about Steam, to be honest. Itch.IO has a review system that’s fairly short format as well, but Itch.IO has one of the most supportive audiences on the web, and some of it, to be honest, is so boring you really wouldn’t be there unless you were the type of person who can use the honor system when donating for games. If you are pretty cool, which you probably are because you’re reading this, go check out Itch.IO, it is home to creative indie brilliance.

  1. Consider what you liked
  2. Then consider what you didn’t like
  3. Try to re-frame your gripes in a positive light that highlights the originality of the designer
  4. Scrap the insults
  5. Revise both the things you liked and things you didn’t like in a helpful context
  6. Realize that this process takes probably 30 seconds at most
  7. Make sure you leave some information that will help the developer and other readers
  8. Post
  9. Play more games, make new reviews, and enjoy being a cool nice person!
Write a Nice Review

Write a Nice Review: The Long Review

The long review is what you write when you do something like what I’m doing here at Mr. Dave Pizza. I regularly play indie games because I enjoy them, so I write about them. It is something that not everybody is probably going to be doing unless they have a blog such as this and are inherently wordy. But let’s say you are.

So, one of the reasons I know about reviewing games nicely is because you really won’t get a lot of traction in any realm–personal, social, professional–if you are not nice to the people who fuel your muse. You can talk shop with your friend Jim at the pub all you want, that’s fine, but when you’re writing something for the people who are doing things FOR you, maybe adhere to some reciprocity!

In the short review, I give some slack, but if you have a blog or soapbox to talk at length about a game unless you’re IGN, your job is to find the gems, not rake mud. I’m serious.

You see, people who want to find out more about a game on an official source actually already know what they want–you don’t have to tell them! I’m not saying don’t be factual, just… play it cool! If you are cool and nice, you might discover that doors open and new connections in the community arrive.

Example: I played a game about a hungry dog last week and the response was so awesome that it actually made me happy in an all-around memorable way. Plus, the dev was really nice to me and brought a lot of attention to my blog. Thanks!

Not every game is going to be your thing, but that’s okay.

Steps to Writing a Long Nice Review

So here’s my list for writing a longer review:

  1. Play the game (of course)
  2. You don’t have to play the whole game but play as much as you can to get a reasonable familiarity
  3. Either record a video or take screenshots, because this will help illustrate your point
  4. Take a break and think.
  5. Write an introduction and title. (you can change everything here later)
  6. Talk about the strengths of the game, everywhere.
  7. You can write about gameplay, aesthetics, features, entertaining parts, whatever
  8. You can write about frustrations, I can’t stop you there, but you also don’t have to.
  9. Format, hashtag, *raspberry*, whatever, post on social media.
  10. Have a slice day.

And yeah, I thought I was going to have to take a long time to explain this, but that’s it! It’s really not that complicated. If you know A LOT about games, you can probably translate that into your review, along with any other personal anecdotes. Anecdotes are actually one of the greatest tools of a writer because they actually make you (sort of) an authority on the topic. But frustrations? Everybody has problems, it’s called the human condition. Give us something new, don’t show us your Comic Book Guy, show us your Duffman!

Final Thoughts

Honestly, I don’t even really think of my posts as reviews anymore. Because who am I to judge something I can’t even do? Showcasing is something people in the community often do, and generally what I do. I just want to share my love of games though. And I know you do too! So, roll up your sleeves, load up some Call of Doomcraft, and get writing!

Thank you for reading Mr. Dave Pizza. If you found this interesting, funny, or whatever, please have a look around my website. I am currently trying to develop some how-to articles to follow through on some of my gaming ideas. If you like what you see, please come back! And thank you for being a kind reviewer! 🙂