Kraino Origins – Beat the First Boss & Enjoy This Great Game

Here we go with Kraino Origins. Add this to your Halloween Indie Game countdowns, because it’s got enough spook for the whole community. This game feels like it was made from the plucking of my own seasonal heart string, with its borderline creep-fest color scheme and environment. Slash your way through constant monsters, zombies, and ghouls in this 2D platformer that spans 8 bosses–now out on Steam!

Kraino Origins – What Is This Magic?

So, the idea here is: “what would happen if you took the classic indie game Shovel Knight and filtered it through grim undertones and replaced the knight and shovel with a psychopomp and scythe?” I honestly didn’t even realize that this is what Kraino Origins is until I did some research online. Why is this significant?

Well, I think it is because I’ve never really played any other games that really executed this effectively–to my knowledge? Once immersed in the game though, I found myself bouncing on zombies’ heads galore because the whole game is built around this. In fact, I insist you know this because this comparison is crucial!

But just in general, this is a very good game, and not too creepy.

I didn’t really think a lowly gamer like myself would come out of this one with honor, but, once again, my experiments paid off. I highly encourage watching the video real quick if you’re on the fence or stuck.

Guide/Tips for Kraino Origins

There are a few things to know about Kraino Origins. Let me break them down.

BOSS (Slurmp):

I struggled hard for the first boss. I’m not an expert platformer, but what I eventually discovered is that if you use the analog stick to orient and then bounce on the boss’s head (with some slight timing) you can take him down fairly easily.

Defeat Slurmp
The first boss, a ghost named Slurmp

This is not obvious at first though, and it’s really just enough to get you through the first part of the game only. Since there are about 8 final bosses, you’ll need to figure out how this timing works as you go along.

If this fails, it’s possible that this technique has been patched, as the dev has informed me that I’m the first to have played it this way! As for now though, it works, so take from it what you will. It’s possible to beat Slurmp without this technique too, just use good timing.


ITEMS & WEAPONS:

Collect coins, shards (they kind of look like broken tokens or moons), and abilities/weapons–purchased from a hidden in-map vendor. These will all help you get through the level and help you take down the boss a lot faster.

Note: There are also checkpoints on every level, including before–at least–right before the first boss. These are very helpful because there are surprises around every corner which you might not survive! (At first.)

MOBS:

There are a few different types and functions of mobs in Kraino Origins.

One is your standard mob, executed by a fell swoop of your scythe one or two times. There are also the ones who a head bounce progresses the precision aspect of the platformer better. Then there is the kind of mobs that are, to be honest, kind of annoying and depend on your ability to time attacks and be in the right place.

That’s it

Anyway, that’s about it for Kraino Origins. It just so happened that my pals over at Indie Game Collective are showcasing it, so it absolutely had to go up on my Halloween list (which you can get to by going to my front page. until October 31st, 2022) It really is a very polished spooky platformer, and if you’re throwing a party or doing a Twitch stream, I highly recommend it! It’s currently only $9.99 on Steam. Here is a link to the game on Steam below:

https://store.steampowered.com/app/1982130/Kraino_Origins?curator_clanid=40853436&utm_source=IndieGameCollective

Why Are Indie Games Popular? – The Truth

First of all, indie games are my favorite “genre.” I think this is an important cultural phenomenon–and also a fun one–but for argument, let’s scrutinize it. So, Indie games usually have fewer details, less polished graphics, and are often focused on the simpler things, so why are indie games popular? And additionally, I might even ask, are they? I’ve been playing and writing about indie games for a couple of years now and I have seen so many genres and concepts that make the games I used to play seem unnecessarily photorealistic and expensive. Knowing what goes into game development actually helped me realize the simple joys of low-scale projects scattered across Steam and the bizarrely creative ItchIO platforms. I’m going to answer this question, because well, I need to, and it’s an important question.

Reason #1 of Why are Indie Games Popular: They’re Cheaper (Well, they are)

Why Are Indie Games Popular?
Celeste

When I was younger, before Steam and all of that kind of thing, there weren’t even really such things as indie games. You either bought the available Nintendo or Sega games at the store, rented it from Blockbuster or Family Video, or got lucky with a hand-me-down or sometimes demos. These days, you can get 1,000s of games not only cheap but totally free–on every platform! That certainly fuels the desire of many gamers. Because if you are like me, those old days of playing one or two games on repeat, while blissful back then, seem totally dreadful to me now.

The cheapness of indie games does give credit to small developers, but it also gives communities a voice that is getting louder. Trends and fashions come and go, but subcultures and artistic aesthetics take grip in a fiercely creative new generation. These days, owning an indie game, even one that you downloaded, can almost seem symbolic with all kinds of social media outlets to share it–or dare I even say, cool! (That’s right, cool AND affordable.)

But this is all kind of abstract.

Reason #2 of Why Indie Games Are Popular: They’re New

Why Are Indie Games Popular?
Viruaverse

The pandemic took a lot of people into new hobbies and even careers involving new things to spend time at home with. This culturally generated shift has prompted what some content creation historians might consider the last great shift in digital individualism.

You can start a podcast, a blog like this, make a movie, music (without any instruments), or more relevantly, video games. When you play an indie game you’re playing something from a real person or small group of people that you can hop on Twitter with and literally talk to like a next-door neighbor in your DMs. I marvel at such transparency, personally.

Indie games also are prolific in saturating the game market. There are so many new games on a regular basis now that you can be a pixel art warrior in the morning and a digital ski-baller at night, both with a spin on current events and not breaking the bank once again.

Reason #3 of Why Indie Games Are Popular: They’re Unique! Perhaps Even Quirky

Why Are Indie Games Popular?
Donut County

So, yeah, obviously this is the #3 on the list, but number one on the books. Indie games can be totally super-duper weird, and get away with it because there are no board meetings or stocks to trade, it’s all in the mind of the dev. Those of us who are fluent in Reddit speak and general geek-speak know there are some pretty wild subcultures out there, and we’re all for it.

Indie games allow for the type of free speech that free speech is intended for. Not the weird abusive anger you see in the headlines, but the kind where somebody who could never produce a TV show suddenly makes a game about that crazy idea they’ve had for years but couldn’t quite share within the limits of their social network.

Reason #4: They’re just cool, and some additional thoughts

Monster Pub Cheers
Monster Pub

Basically, indie games are just cool. Good art is like that. Michelangelo painted the Sistine Chapel ceiling by himself and it’s regarded as perhaps one of the most beautiful masterpieces in history. As such, I really like playing funny games with weird graphics. Not the same at all, but good things can come from the rogue midnight-oil coders of the ambitions of a day-time waitress or a stay-at-home-dad. I have played many great indie games out there, and here are a few:

  1. Celeste
  2. Cryptid Crush
  3. Stardew Valley
  4. Cosmo’s Quickstop
  5. Hades
  6. Hoa

Thanks for reading

These are just some general thoughts I had after spending many days playing indie games and wondering what they had in store for me. It really is a great way to play games and it helped me escape from the lofty polish of more popular games. Games are fun but try something different when you choose your next game, you might like it. If you’re already doing so, keep on playing those indies!

This article was written for MrDavePizza.com by Dave Pizza. Thanks for reading!

Labyrinth City: Pierre the Maze Detective (IGC)


It’s been some time since a game like this has been featured on MrDavePizza. Labyrinth City: Pierre the Maze Detective absolutely belongs. As a game that originated in a book series, the game takes many cues from the visual classics of growing up for me. Incidentally, I was a big fan of books like Where’s Waldo? and Eye Spy, which are similar in scope and content as Pierre the Maze Detective–perhaps you remember too. So, let’s get into this, what is Labyrinth City? It’s a top-down puzzle game with hand-drawn characters in a visual feast of eccentric characters and scenes. You must navigate through a maze of people to track down the devious “Mr. X.” I spent some time playing it so you can know what to expect from this delightful indie with a charming and surprising origin to a perfectly playable game form. Okay, let’s have a look.

Having a Look Around Labyrinth City: Pierre the Maze Detective

So, before I give the breakdown of Labyrinth City, please note that I received a free copy of this as a showcase opportunity to my friends at The Indie Game Collective and Darjeeling’s publisher Pixmain. Thanks, guys!

Labyrinth City: Pierre the Maze Detective starts off with a cinematic introduction Mr. X, the story’s villain, and Pierre, the maze detective. Mr. X has stolen a magic stone from the museum that is leading to all sorts of chaos. Get your feet wet and navigate through large crowds, who usually obstruct any obvious paths, to track down the location of Mr. X.

Once found, the chase continues onto the next individual location where the process starts over.

Achivements and Features

Each level is taken from pages of the original illustrations book and animated to provide over 500 interactions. You could certainly speed run through each level at an average of 10 minutes per area like I did, or you can take your time to savor the many sites and sounds of the game.

There are prompts next to several characters and objects throughout each scene. This can provide story depth and entertainment as well as completable achievements. Examples include a mail carrier with a letter, lockboxes spread through the maze, or up to three collectible stars which you’ll need to search to find. There are many many ways to interact with fully animated locations.

These achievements aren’t necessary but add an enjoyable boost of gameplay to solve. If you are either still trying to find Mr. X or want to enjoy the content throughout the game at your own pace, these are a satisfying way to enjoy Labyrinth City. Many puzzle games grab players with a hook of being able to provide lots of content to tease your mind and test your reasoning skills; this is one of those games.

More Info & Where To Get It

If you’re interested in finding out more about the game Labyrinth City: Pierre the Maze Detective, check out the Steam store page or look for it on Nintendo Switch.

If you enjoyed this content, please be sure to return for frequent excellent content. There are tons of indie games. I am thinking of starting a mailing list/newsletter with a summary of new articles, so stay tuned for that. I hope you enjoyed this article. Thanks for reading MrDavePizza.